hajj

hajj Packages

HAJJ INTENTION !

The intention (Niyyah) must be pure and sincere for the sake of God only, but not for any other worldly motives, such as Showing off (Riyaa) Avoiding rebukes for not performing Hajj. Fear of poverty for it is known that one who does not perform Hajj is afflicted with poverty. Business prospects etc. All these other motives destroy the sincerity (Ikhlaas) of the deeds and deprive one of the promised rewards. It is foolish to undertake all this rigor and expense only to end up in Damnation because the motive was adulterated. One should sincerely repent of past sins and clear all the dues, (Huquq-un-Naas), and cleanse himself of all distractions so that the mind is easily turned towards God.

One should write his will and prepare for the journey to the Hereafter as he leaves his house, relatives, friends, and possessions behind. One should remember the majesty of the House and the Absolute Owner, and that one has chosen to leave family, friends, and possessions for the lofty and noble purpose of visiting a House, which the Almighty has designed as a sanctuary for all people. Hence this journey differs from all other worldly journeys. The pilgrim is one of those who have responded willingly to the invitation made by the Almighty’s messenger.

The pilgrim should free himself of all matters, which tend to worry him so his total attention is towards the Almighty. Any financial loss or physical affliction in this journey should be greeted happily, for, it is a sign of acceptance of Hajj. The Pilgrim should ensure his earnings are acquired through lawful means and he should be liberal in expenditure, not extravagant (Israaf) though. But spending for the needy and deserving is not extravagance as it has been reported that there is no goodness in extravagance and no extravagance in goodness! He should behave courteously towards his fellow travelers, smiling and talking gently with them, avoiding harsh words, abuses or vain talk.

He should be humble to the other guests of the Almighty. Magnanimity does not only mean not to hurt others but also to endure when others hurt. He should be disheveled and dusty, avoid cosmetics or any cause of pride and beauty, and if possible, travel on foot, especially from Makkah to Mina, Masher and Arafah, not as a means to avoid extra expenses (in which case, transport is better!) rather for exerting oneself for the sake of God, except if it affects other worship (Ibadat) or supplication (Dua).

HAJJ SERVICES !

We offer a variety of Hajj Services depending on the type of Package selected. As Hajj specialists we have the resources and the professionalism to provide you the services that will make your Hajj a comfortable and hassle-free experience. Our Hajj services include:
Complete documentation and filing of application forms for Hajj Visa (Pakistan Only)

  • Airline tickets
  • Accommodation in select 5, 4 and 3 star Hotels that are within 100 to 200 meters from Haram Sharif both in Makkah & Madina
  • Catering and meal services
  • Private Double / Triple / Quad rooms
  • Ziarat services in Makkah and Madina
  • Transport arrangement throughout Hajj in air-conditioned buses
  • Sightseeing trip to Jeddah
  • Professional coordination to ensure client satisfaction

HAJJ PROCEDURE !

On the first day of the Hajj, pilgrims sweep out of Makkah towards Mina, a small uninhabited village east of the city. Pilgrims generally spend their time meditating and praying, as the Prophet (PBUH) did on his pilgrimage.

During the second day, the 9th of Zul-Hijjah, pilgrims leave Mina for the plain of Arafat for the wuquf, “the standing,” the central rite of the Hajj. As they congregate there, the pilgrims’ stance and gathering reminds them of the Day of Judgment. Some of them gather at the Mount of Mercy, where the Prophet (PBUH) delivered his unforgettable Farewell Sermon, enunciating far-reaching religious, economic, social and political reforms. The Prophet (PBUH) is reported to have asked God to pardon the sins of pilgrims who “stood” at ‘Arafat, and was granted his wish. Thus, the hopeful pilgrims prepare to leave this plain joyfully, feeling reborn without sin and intending to turn over a new leaf.

Just after sunset, the mass of pilgrims proceeds to Muzdalifah, an open plain about halfway between ‘Arafat and Mina. There they first pray and then collect a fixed number of chickpea-sized pebbles to use on the following days.

Before daybreak on the third day, pilgrims move en masse from Muzdalifah to Mina. There they cast at white pillars the pebbles they have previously collected. According to some traditions, this practice is associated with Prophet Ibrahim (PBUH). As pilgrims throw seven pebbles at each of these pillars, they remember the story of Satan’s attempt to persuade Ibrahim (PBUH) to disregard God’s command to sacrifice his son.

Following the casting of the pebbles, most pilgrims sacrifice a goat, sheep or some other animal. They give the meat to the poor after, in some cases, keeping a small portion for themselves. As the pilgrims have, at this stage, finished a major part of the Hajj, they are now allowed to shed their ihram and put on everyday clothes. On this day Muslims around the world share the happiness the pilgrims feel and join them by performing identical, individual sacrifices in a worldwide celebration of ‘Id al-Adha, “the Festival of Sacrifice.”

Men either shave their heads or clip their hair, and women cut off a symbolic lock, to mark their partial deconsecration. This is done as a symbol of humility. All proscriptions, save the one of conjugal relations, are now lifted.

Still sojourning in Mina, pilgrims visit Makkah to perform another essential rite of the Hajj: the tawaf, the seven-fold circling of the Ka’bah, with a prayer recited during each circuit. Their circumambulation of the Ka’bah, the symbol of God’s oneness, implies that all human activity must have God at its center. It also symbolizes the unity of God and man.

After completing the tawaf, pilgrims pray, preferably at the Station of Ibrahim, the site where Ibrahim (PBUH) stood while he built the Ka’bah. Then they drink of the water of Zamzam.

Another, and sometimes final, rite is the say, or “the running.” This is a reenactment of a memorable episode in the life of Hagar (PBUH), who was taken into what the Qur’an calls the “uncultivable valley” of Makkah, with her infant son Ishmael, to settle there.

The say commemorates Hagar’s (PBUH) frantic search for water to quench Ishmael’s (PBUH) thirst. She ran back and forth seven times between two rocky hillocks, al-Safa and al-Marwah, until she found the sacred water known as Zamzam. This water, which sprang forth miraculously under Ishmael’s tiny feet, is now enclosed in a marble chamber the Ka’bah.

These rites performed, the pilgrims are completely deconsecrated: They may resume all normal activities. According to the social customs of some countries, pilgrims can henceforth proudly claim the title of al-Hajj or Hajji.

They now return to Mina, where they stay up to the 12th or 13th day of Zul-Hijjah. There they throw their remaining pebbles at each of the pillars in the manner either practiced or approved by the Prophet (PBUH). They then take leave of the friends they have made during the Hajj. Before leaving Makkah, however, pilgrims usually make a final tawaf round the Ka’bah to bid farewell to the Holy City

Coming soon